NEWSFLASH: God TV has £3m pledged but LESS THAN £100,000 BANKED AS RORY ALEC PUTS A BUSINESS-AS-USAUL FACE ON PROCEEDINGS

God TV have the £3m in pledges. Start Feb 13- Date of 27 Feb 2008 of £3m. HOWEVER less than £100,000 is  banked spelling the imminent demise of God TV on March 14 2008.

Rory Alec has decided to adopt a business as  usaul approach highlighting Israel tour especially Global Day of prayer and the Call ( lou engle)  to steer first time visitors to  GLOBAL events (emphasis). Alec is full of Global this Global that whilst  the God TV Team have been upping pre-recorded segments avoiding the dreaded LIVES ; USING RICK JOYNER, MIKE BICKLE. Rory alec is determined to not have us see him in tears and is his usual headstrong out of control self.Wendy alec seems restrained and realistic and even trying to get a bit  of reality into proceedings.

An important note if God is in it etc you get accountants say so. The Accountant advised Rory alec against starting God Tv and alec went against his advice, rory alec has since chosen to ignore Professionals advice and the voice of the suppliers ever since in 12 years of existence. Now the shit is hitting the fan and they HAVE TO GET ACTUAL MONEY IN THE ACCOUNT OR THEY ARE OFF THE AIR SOMETHING THEY HAVE NEVER DONE.

NEWSFLASH: GOD TV RUNNING TOTAL WAY BEHIND TARGETS NEEDED £100 000 A DAY I PREDICT DEMISE OF GOD TV ON PRESENT BANKED RATES

GOD TV NEEDS £100 000 A DAY TO MAKE £3M NEEDED TO KEEP GOD TV FROM BEING TAKEN OFF THE AIR AS CREDITORS HAVE FINALLY HAD ENOUGH (DISTRIBUTERS AND SATTELLITES I ESTIMATE TO BE 7 NOW WITH SEVERE LOSSES, DOWN BY HALF FROM ORIGINAL 15 FIGURE.

SHORT POST AS PC DIES

The Beginning of the End: God channel appeals for £3m IN BANK by 14 march

Endless bail outs by viewers: the vault, the so-called demonic attacks; the unprecedented studio invasion swept under the carpet by god tv. ignoring concerns of viewers giving rise to such protests; missions week being ONLY TIME VIEWERS CAN MAKE ANY KIND OF PROTEST; WITHDRAWAL OF FUNDS, SWEARING AT THE SCREEN, TAKING PISS ETC ETC; all forbidden by god tv and incidentally in breach of all known human rights conventions!(freedom of expression/speech  integrity of creation etc) a quick post as pc dies after 15 mins.

Chroncicles of Brothers Learning from negative reviews providing balance from Alec’s friends spamming review forums

This books like a very expensive Tract-from the Reviews-with poor Characterization, lack of imagination, yet another expression of the aberrant Christianity so characteristic of God TV. If there was a way for me to read Library Copies and review Series for nothing I would  because it looks like a load of rubbish. Francis Francipane clearly knows nothing of Writing like www.nanowrimo.org

or has any idea of even giving her a chance to learn how to write by writing crap as the rest of do.

What the hapless reader is not aware of is most books are ghosted because they wrongly despise the education that would equip them to write in the first place; as well as the theology to save them. Bickle et al reveals

Faulty and aberrant theology is at the root of ALL the Alec’s problem and an unteachable spirit in the Church which they left and despise hate with a passion.

We all know that God TV has it’s allies to plant Reviews on key sites giving the impression of sound theology and good sellable writing. But you are not supposed to know that.

Assess the evidence for yourself and judge if you think I am onto something.

Wendy Alec Chronicles of Brothers:The Fall of Lucifer and The First Judgement

 

Sunday, 18 November 2007

10:11:53 AM

 

The most expensive Tract ever at £47 7×7=49

Theological errors

Friends

Positive only of course.

Bickle

           

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Milton did it better, 27 Oct 2007

By        Jl Munro “jimmunro” (Strathaven Scotland) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

How do you describe the indescribable? Wendy makes a valiant attempt but in spite of using almost all the most colourful adjectives in the language she cannot make understandable, what is by definition beyond human understanding.Why does the Almighty need an army on the scale described? Why do three immensely powerful beings behave like standard sword and sorcery princelings – and not very intelligent ones at that? I would seriously suggest those who were moved to tears by this should try reading Milton’s Paradise Lost, a voice from a time when many truly believed that the forces of AntiChrist were massing on the horizon and that the great battle between good and evil was being literally fought out across Europe. She writes well and from the heart and it’s a good read – but….

Comment

 

 

 

           

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars A Don’t Read, May 23, 2007

By        DJ West (Pheonix, AZ USA) – See all my reviews

When one wants to describe fiction well here it is. I would say this book could be said fiction, fiction, fiction. It has so much unBibical stuff it could lead any unBeliever further from God. I wish there was a way to make the author understand what kind of bad reputation she has done as a author. I will never again buy a book from her again.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

           

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Mind-numbingly boreing!, April 13, 2007

By        Michael Little “HistoBuff” (OCONUS) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

This is exactly why i don’t read fiction. This book portrays itself as facts but the author spends way too much time on details. i don’t really need 3 paragraphs describing exatly what a particular gate looked like. I’m not sure how this book got past an editor, but obviously it did. Alot of this book is highly inacurate according to the Bible and the Satanic bible about The Fall. It does have it good points and will draw you in, only to completely bore you minutes later.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

           

3 of 8 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Too much fluff…, March 21, 2007

By        Heather Tenney (Cincinnati, OH) – See all my reviews

Something most writers never learn–brevity. This author never learned how to be concise either. I tried to read it, I really did! I was very excited about the book, thought I’d love it. I couldn’t get past the pages and pages of over the top imagery and the descriptions. She was trying to create word pictures of what Heaven is like, and went way overboard. (I made it through the Left Behind books, and they are really badly written and I don’t agree with all of their premises either. That says a lot about the way this was written.) I didn’t get far enough to have much to say about the theology of the book–but the idea of Michael, Gabriel and Satan being brothers, I just didn’t like. I think you need to be very solid in your faith before reading this, don’t actually think this is real. Satan is real, God is real, angels are real, but it is a work of fiction. And a badly written one at that. I’d give it fewer stars, but I am encouraged that someone is trying to tackle the idea of the Heavens and the spiritual realm.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review

 

 

           

1 of 10 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely DIRE :(, 2 Sep 2006

By        Romayne Wright “Ha Tikvah” (N. Ireland U.K.) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

Think this is about the first time ever I’ve bought a book with fairly high expectations, only to be utterly disappointed, and downright annoyed to a degree on how anyone who calls themselves a Christian could write such drivel about a very sensitive subject. Almost all of this book was so totally boring, and rarely managed to make me consider any of the story interesting enough to turn the page at times. I ended up speed reading it, only to confirm my initial thoughts – that I certainly wasn’t going to find it an inspirational or remotely interesting story. In fact, I wonder why she feels its a suitable topic to write about to start with, and the mystical way in which the story is woven just depressed me. Having God’s HOLY angels cavorting around playing games on each other was just ridiculous reading even for a fictional piece – all I can say is if you’re a Christian steer clear. If you’re an atheist with an interest in the occult you might possibly enjoy it enough to keep reading past the first chapter.

Comment Comme

 

           

6 of 11 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Tries to take on Universal mysteries and present them as a Soap Opera. Fails., 12 Aug 2006

By        J.S (UK) – See all my reviews

Hyperbole and filled with paradox, with no attempt whatsoever at imagination. The author tries to describe the indescribable, attributing human/ mortal traits to angels and describing heaven in terms of a physical world i.e. – gold, rubies, diamonds in abundance everywhere, which frankly would pale in beauty after a few millennia for even the most fervent of God botherers. One suspects that if there is such a place as Heaven, it would be completely mind blowing. Many Authors have a gift for creating mystical places, a gift this Author is clearly missing.

 

Fails to explore the paradox of Lucifer, by attributing free will and souls to angels, where they previously have never had these things. The conundrum of Lucifer is that God created this being with no free will, but it turns from God. What should have been explored is why Jehovah would create a being that would turn against him and hate his new creation – man. This intimates a use or purpose for Lucifer the Renegade.

 

To make the point, why would one of the leaders of the kings of heaven be wearing a monocle?? Attributing mortal deteriation of the body to a non-physical being, designed to be immortal is just silly.

 

There have been many attempts by Man to describe or understand the nature of God and his Angels, eternity and Mans place, however this book doesn’t make a dint in the mystery.

 

If you’re into stuff like this, try the following: The Bible, The Qur’an, The Torah, The Book of Enoch, The Dead Sea Scrolls etc. These titles don’t have the Dynasty/ Brookside element that Wendy Alec has introduced to the greatest of mysteries, but you’ll get a clearer picture ;-)

Comment Comment | Permalink | Was this review helpful to you?

 

 

 

           

7 of 13 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but falls short somewhat, 7 Jun 2006

By        J. Snape “snap69″ – See all my reviews

(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)  

This book could have been so much better. The story is a classic and so ripe for a ripping fantasy yarn, and Alec does inject a stackload of characters and builds a whole almost governmental structure into heaven, but somehow I just don’t think it works.

The book would have benefitted from a strict editor and I doubt that there was one. Published by a christian organisation and written by an evangelist of sorts, a little more secular objectivity would have made for a better story. More specifically, I couldn’t help feeling that the entire story was being rushed along in parts and set up for yet more espousing of the endless beauty of God, almost ad nauseum.

I’d agree that where it really falls short is in the lack of depth of characterisation. The opportunity to look right into the darkest of mythology’s souls (Lucifer’s) goes begging. It all seemed a bit rushed and full of missed opportunities to expand on the whole story.

The next book is Messiah, and I’ll probably buy it, but I really hope that it isn’t another commentary on the New Testament, which it has every risk of being.

 

 

           

7 of 11 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars Missing some depth, 29 May 2006

By        A. D. MacFarlane (England, UK) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I felt that this novel fell short of what it could have been. My first main criticism is that the outcome was far too clear-cut. Yes, we all know that Lucifer will fall and Michael and Gabriel will not, but Wendy Alec did next to nothing to play with this assumption. What do I mean? Well, for just a handful of pages, there was this wonderful doubt about Gabriel’s fate – I found myself thinking ‘Surely he won’t fall!’. I never had that doubt with either Lucifer – the moment he heard of Man he got in a huff and decided that they would usurp his position as Jehovah’s most beloved – or Michael – he was like a piece of cardboard, to be honest. The novel would have been so much better if I had found myself wondering about the fates of all three brothers, if even for just a moment I wondered how they would fulfill their known destiny because something that happened made it look as if they would swing the other way. Because this happened with Gabriel, for just a moment, I found him the most interesting character.

 

Which leads me to my second main criticism: lack of depth in characterisation. I never felt like I got into the heads of any of the three brothers… but they’re the main characters, surely, as the series is named after them. With Lucifer, his turmoil was only ever seen by others; I would have loved to get right inside his head while he still struggled with himself, before he fell. I would also like to have known Michael’s motives rather than just take for granted that he will serve Jehovah forever. Even Gabriel, who was the most interesting, didn’t get nearly as much depth as he deserved.

 

A final criticism, and one that is probably just me being anal, is her writing style. She started almost all of her sentences with either the character’s name or the pronoun (he), which is incredibly dull to read. Also, she had a habit of listing adjectives while describing something, which doesn’t quite bring the scene to life.

 

 

           

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars Average, 26 April 2006

By        A. R. Fletcher (UK) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I had great expectations for this book, unfortunately I finished it feeling unfulfilled. It could have been something amazing but turned out quite average. Within the first pages there was a mistake in the text, Wendy states that Gabriel is riding a large white mare, within the next paragraph the mare becomes a white stallion, this kind of mistake is pure sloppiness and I always find it an irritation in books that have been professionally printed and one assumes proof read.

 

The book attempts to get across the pure majesty and awesomeness of God, which is a feat in itself, Wendy attacks it quite verbosely and you can end up struggling with the whole concept and imagery.

 

I struggled with some of the concepts explored within the book, in particular the involvement of the angels in creation and the ark. I felt that Wendy had moved away from biblical principals, I imagine this is always a struggle when writing a novel, however I felt uncomfortable with her interpretations.

 

All in all it was ok but not as promising as it looked.

 

 

           

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars Missed Opportunity, 19 April 2006

By        A. Baker “CytBO3″ (U.K.) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I approached this book with relish, it sounded to me like a great read exploring what could have been the real story behind the fall of Lucifer. However, the story – whilst essentially gripping, misses a number of opportunities. In particualr the actual fall of lucifer himself is not explained particualrly well – one moment he is an adoring and loyal servant of God the next he is a jealous and petulant child. There is barely an explanation for this change, no explanation for the pride and jealousy which materislises from one page to the next. What results is less an intelligent exploration of the motives of the characters involved and more an overly descriptive, slightly embellished and unoriginal recitation of the same story we have been told before. It is a shame that the author couldn’t resist the temptation to preach rather than properly explore her material. I was however, particualrly amused by the angels use of science in designing man – it’s worth a read for that if nothing else.

 

           

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Yuk!, 19 April 2006

By        Shivari (London, UK) – See all my reviews

 

I bought this during a quick trip to a bookstore to grab some holiday reading. I hadn’t read any reviews, but it seemed promising. I struggled through one chapter or so, then gave up. My problem was the way that the author represents the speech of the archangels. Unless you’re a devout Christian believer, it will leave you gagging. For me, Alec simply fails to deliver a genuine sense of love and awe in their words, and instead produces a twee, saccharin mush. The thought of spending eternity gushing like that would be enough to send the most devout angel into rebellion. Which, of course, it does!

 

Granted it must be very difficult to reproduce how an archangel might talk about God – but CS Lewis makes a fair go of it in Perelandra (Voyage to Venus). Alec fails miserably.

 

ANNALS OF THE ARCHANGELS

THE ILLUMINATI

 

 

THREE EARTHLY BROTHERS

RAPTURE

MILLENIUM

 

Spammed Reviews.

 

 

 

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 starsHorrible Dialogue, February 2, 2007

By

Clifton GoodwinSee all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

The book has an interesting premise, almost like a Shakespearean epic of the turmoil between three princes, but gosh the dialogue is so badly written it’s hard to hack your way along after a while.. just tiresome. I’m sorry but it’s the truth!

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you? <!– function showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ document.write(““); } function restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } function showYesButton(vUrl, uId){ var yesImg = ““; document.write(yesImg); } function showNoButton(vUrl, uId){ var noImg = ““; document.write(noImg); } function sendYesNoRating(vUrl,uId){ restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); var voteLayer = document.getElementById(‘YesNoVotingFrame_’+uId); var ifDoc; if ( voteLayer.contentDocument ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentDocument; } else if ( voteLayer.contentWindow ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentWindow.document; } else if ( voteLayer.document ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.document; } if ( ifDoc ) { ifDoc.location.replace(vUrl); } else { voteLayer.src = vUrl; } if ( ”.length > 0 ) { showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uId); } return false; } function showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uid) { var noBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_no’); var yesBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_yes’); var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uid); if( noBtn != null && yesBtn != null && msgLayer != null) { noBtn.style.display = ‘none'; yesBtn.style.display = ‘none'; msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } } function showYesNoResponse(uId,result,value) { var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); if ( result == “SUCCESS” ) { msgLayer.innerHTML = “
Thanks for your feedback.”; } else { showVoteErrorResponse(msgLayer,result,value, “”); } } //–> <!– var uId = ‘2115R146BP7SC47A0SHelpfulReviews3′; var vyUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.id=ARFI9WNO103XB&type=if&uid=2115R146BP7SC47A0SHelpfulReviews3&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S&label=Helpful&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1=1&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2=1&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; var vnUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.id=ARFI9WNO103XB&type=if&uid=2115R146BP7SC47A0SHelpfulReviews3&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S&label=Helpful&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1=1&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2=1&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; document.write(”);showYesButton(vyUrl,uId); showNoButton(vnUrl,uId); document.write(”);showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); //–> YesNoYesNo

 

<!– document.write( “Report this” ); //–> Report this Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

6 of 10 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 starsNot really worth a read , January 7, 2007

By

humbleservant (USA) – See all my reviews

I wouldn’t find it easy to recommend this book to anyone either, as a couple have already mentioned. To be fair, this isn’t an easy topic for a novel, much less any religious discussion (if one were to lecture on it, for instance), but there were too many problems in the book for it to be all that enjoyable a read. I’m used to overlooking such issues and giving books a better review than perhaps some have deserved, even if I keep those opinions to myself. But I’ve decided to give my first amazon review on this book, mainly as a balance for all the positive ones it’s received so far…it deserves some more constructive cricism.

If you’re one to be bothered by the unbibilical events and the like in the book, then I definitely wouldn’t recommend it. What happens in the book doesn’t make it so terrible, but I was not pleased with the way the angels seem to run everything in Heaven, as some other reviewers have also mentioned. I tried to get past that so that I could at least finish the book, but also what I found a hindrance and often an annoyance as well was the excessive descriptiveness of the environment and even the adornments and garments of the angels and places in heaven. I don’t say it to be picky, but as a warning, just the way the author uses such words to describe everything in heaven, (often it seems everything has a jewel on it), to attempt to portray the beauty of the place or to make for better richness of her description of it seems that she’s overcompensating for a lack of delivery in other areas, or just that there’s too much emphasis on these material goods because she has no other way to describe the beauty of that realm. It helps that another review said that the book was originally a script for a movie, which would have helped with the descriptivenss of the text, but much of the detail could have actually been left out for the book itself. I got really lost in just trying to imagine these really fantastical places, in and outside of heaven. It really came across to me as highly materialistic, as if the emphasis should have been more on the visual and material wealth of heaven, as if all that was the beauty of that (hope that makes some sense). Some readers might not be annoyed by that at all though. And I agree with one review that mentioned the lack of continuity or even a certain connection between the prologue and the epilogue.

*Some spoilers* Though the story does have a few good points, just events or explanations that I kind of liked, such as painting Lucifer as the “author of death” when he killed his pet panther, it seemed to me that the characterization wasn’t always that strong, not of Lucifer the deceiver, he didn’t yet come across as the kind of mastermind I’d imagined him to be. And it wasn’t too pleasing to read Gabriel as one who wavered in his loyalty to God and the Christos. Sure, the book’s about the familial relationship between the three “brothers” and even does well enough in portraying Gabriel as the youngest of the three and therefore one to look up to Lucifer, and one to find it the most difficult (at times) to eschew Lucifer’s advances and offers after the fall. But Gabriel did not at all come across as the strong, loyal and pure angel that he was even when he delivered the message to Mary before she was to conceive Jesus.

As was mentioned in some other reviews, especially the ones that gave the book fewer stars than most, which I do not disagree with, one problem I had with the story was the emphasis on the importance of DNA in the human race and the corruption of that DNA as the cause for the flood. It could make sense in some other ways, for one to kind of explain the cause for the Nephilim away, but it strays too much from Biblical truth, I believe, and that makes it less enjoyable, if not in some ways slightly disturbing. And the book had the angels handling way too much activity and decision-making processes in Heaven. Whenever there was a problem in Heaven or with the human race, it was always the angels who decided the solution for every situation, not God. God was nearly nonexistant. It was good that Christos had a place, but not as often as I would have liked or as would have made sense. And the angels had a place for science. It perhaps demonstrates the author’s use of Enochian texts (as another reviewer mentioned) since there isn’t much to go on from the Bible in regards to what angels knew of the practice anyway. It might be there to explain the origins of science (might happen later in the series), where humans might have obtained the knowledge from, but that the angels were working out specific equations even for the building of the ark (completely took out the part where God Himself gave those directions to Noah), and even with the DNA of Man shows too much of their involvement with the workings of the Universe, as if God were never even needed. It was all very weird.

I found the “Chronicles of the Host” series, by Brian Shafer, a much more enjoyable read. It covered the stories in the Bible from the perspective of the angels and had really great moments. I think it’s a much better read if one wants to imagine what it might have been like amongst the angels, etc. That’s the kind of book I’d recommend.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you? <!– function showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ document.write(““); } function restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } function showYesButton(vUrl, uId){ var yesImg = ““; document.write(yesImg); } function showNoButton(vUrl, uId){ var noImg = ““; document.write(noImg); } function sendYesNoRating(vUrl,uId){ restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); var voteLayer = document.getElementById(‘YesNoVotingFrame_’+uId); var ifDoc; if ( voteLayer.contentDocument ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentDocument; } else if ( voteLayer.contentWindow ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentWindow.document; } else if ( voteLayer.document ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.document; } if ( ifDoc ) { ifDoc.location.replace(vUrl); } else { voteLayer.src = vUrl; } if ( ”.length > 0 ) { showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uId); } return false; } function showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uid) { var noBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_no’); var yesBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_yes’); var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uid); if( noBtn != null && yesBtn != null && msgLayer != null) { noBtn.style.display = ‘none'; yesBtn.style.display = ‘none'; msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } } function showYesNoResponse(uId,result,value) { var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); if ( result == “SUCCESS” ) { msgLayer.innerHTML = “
Thanks for your feedback.”; } else { showVoteErrorResponse(msgLayer,result,value, “”); } } //–> <!– var uId = ‘2115R3U527KG8AQCSNHelpfulReviews4′; var vyUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&type=if&uid=2115R3U527KG8AQCSNHelpfulReviews4&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN&label=Helpful&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.id=A2SJ8Q2EM03I8Q&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; var vnUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&type=if&uid=2115R3U527KG8AQCSNHelpfulReviews4&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN&label=Helpful&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.id=A2SJ8Q2EM03I8Q&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; document.write(”);showYesButton(vyUrl,uId); showNoButton(vnUrl,uId); document.write(”);showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); //–> YesNoYesNo

 

<!– document.write( “Report this” ); //–> Report this Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

 

 

           

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars This book is just plain bad, December 14, 2006

By        T. D. Newton “gdtarrant” (Denver, CO) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

Let me preface by saying that I don’t normally read Christian fiction and I don’t normally write book reviews, so this is a double-first for me. I purchased this book because I think alternate views of Biblical mythology are good fuel to get me thinking. I’d never tell someone else that they would or wouldn’t like this book; this review is to tell you why I disliked this book so much. This may contain a few spoilers, but seeing as how this book is supposed to be part 1 of 5 I do not think it’s much of an issue.

 

First and foremost, the book is full of bad writing. Major writing mistakes are things like discontinuity (Michael takes off his cloak and then takes it off again), improper usage of expressions (Lucifer recoiling at the use of the word MAN but then a few pages later referring to another angel as “a man of their word”), typos that could have been found by a simple proofread, and redundant embellishment (…with jewels of every type one could imagine: rubies, diamonds, emeralds…). There were many chapters that were simply too short; a break in the chapter to go to a new one was completely unnecessary. Finally, the Prologue and the Epilogue portions were completely disconnected and pointless. You should be able to take them out of the story and still have it be complete, but they should still relate to the story (otherwise why have them?).

 

Bad writing I can forgive, to a certain extent, if the story, premise, plot, characters, or other elements have value. Unfortunately, the other major problem I have with this novel is that none of those things have value. The author has deviated so far from Biblical mythology that I was either scratching my head (or cursing aloud) through the entire second half of the book. A good example of this is the purpose of Noah’s Ark; Lucifer plans to eradicate the human race by having his fallen angels breed with the human women and mutate our DNA. Both here and much earlier in the book I questioned the motivations; if you can physically affect a human being via fornication, why not actually just kill them? A friend of mine said the fact that there were science labs in heaven and that Lucifer and Gabriel basically “held hands and skipped down the beach” made him stop reading the book 6 chapters in. He also didn’t like the fact that there were unicorns (and blue griffons) in heaven.

 

I struggled through to the end, hoping (and praying) that I would find some kind of redeeming quality in the novel’s content, but it was not to be. You may be able to look past these things but, being an aspiring writer myself, I really take notice when things are done this poorly. The author is in dire need of a thesaurus and a good proofreader. I would imagine that the only type of person that could really enjoy this book is one who has not studied the mythology or read the Bible; the same kind of people who believe there is some element of truth to movies like Constantine.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment (1)

 

 

 

           

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Don’t bother reading this book, October 6, 2006

By        Robert Sillas (Yuba City, CA United States) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I first saw this book and I really thought it would be interesting, I’m a avid Christian fiction reader, and I study the Word of God daily, but with that being said I tried to read this book, and I kept saying come on now, and no way, it happened so much that I put the down, and I hope to sell it, to a used book store,

 

Some of the problems I have with the book are:

Gabriel actually couldn’t make his mind up and Michael the archangel thought he might side with Lucifer?

And how she (being the author) deals with the flood of Noah, the angels actually think that man has been completely corrupted, and God will destroy the whole earth, and that Lucifer will win, and someone at the last second, actually figures out that the genealogy of Noah was uncorrupted, now that’s was enough for me, she sell the angels so short that they actually think God, the I AM, the creator of the Universe, and Man, almost lost, completely sells God short.

 

Don’t read this one, at least that’s my opinion, God bless

 

           

8 of 17 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Diappointing and quite frankly rather boring, July 3, 2006

By        Tamilore (London, United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

My main problem with this novel is that it was severely lacking in substance. When dealing with a topic like ‘the fall of Lucifer’ which, has been dealt with by many an author, some level of finesse is required in characterisation and general plot. Wendy Alec fails to deliver any form of characterisation and instead relies on her rather suspect skills of description as she attempts to conjure up an image of the unimaginable, Heaven. I didn’t give this book 1 star because it was badly written or because there was no ‘meat’ to the story. I gave this book 1 star because it just utterly failed to captivate me. There was a great deal of repetition of language and imagery, I mean if I had to read one more sentence about hair ‘braided with platinum and lightning’, I would have screamed! Most sci-fi and fantasy novels try to depict too many events and characters and thus leave a disjointed product. In this novel, the cast is of a manageable size and the main players are clear. This could have potentially made it easier to understand and empathise with the characters but somehow it all falls flat here.

In ‘The Fall of Lucifer’, we are presented with a story that has essentially been told in the Judaeo-Christian religious writings. A story of how Lucifer, ‘Son of the Morning’ and archanagel of the Almighty, becomes the Satan we know today. The decision to tackle this subject matter as a fantasy novel intrigued me and I bought this book in the hopes of reading an interesting take on extant subject matter. That is not what I came to find. I feel that since the author clearly had nothing new to add, and didn’t take the time to craft realistic and interesting characters with motivations and agendas, she should just not have bothered writing this novel at all.

 

1 of 11 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable, if slightly flawed read, April 9, 2006

By        Mr. M. O. Ajose (London United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I enjoyed this novel because of its interesting take on Biblical events. Alec’s characterisation of the angels was solid and you really feel a deep sense of Lucifer’s alienation and pain after his fall and the emotional rift between himself and his brothers.

My qualms with the novel were that although Alec’s descriptions are mostly vivid and illustrative throughout, they sometimes bordered on the childlike (e.g. ‘ten thousand times ten thousands eons of love’). I also had issue with the way in which the angels are described as co-creators with God (of man) and felt that more intense, longer war scenes could have been included when describing Lucifer’s rebellion.

Otherwise, the pacing of the novel was good and the immersive fantasy worlds described show that it was OBVIOUSLY written to be filmed (the story was originally a screenplay). The idea of Lucifer’s jealousy of mankind, although not strictly biblical, is interesting and plausible. Alec manages to clearly & imaginately explain the gospel message, whilst weaving a pacy, exciting read.

 

           

20 of 25 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Confused, February 17, 2006

By        J.DeW. (America) – See all my reviews

Alec is unable to display spiritual worlds. Lucifer is in rebellion at the idea of a material yet Heaven is described by Alec as being very much a material realm (they eat, sleep, draw blood from one another, have computers and electronic equipment!!!).

Furthermore, it seems silly and somewhat blasphemous for an evangelical Christian like Alec to even float the idea that God needs the help of billions and billions of sapphire armored, platinum braided, emerald tinged angels (this is the way Alec writes) to assist in creating the universe.

I was very disappointed by this book.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

 

           

19 of 28 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars What Is She Going on About?, February 8, 2006

By        cherie (new york) – See all my reviews

This could have been a great story! Instead Alec rather rip off Sword and Sorcery, Dungeons and Dragons (both of which she probably so piously disapproves).

She spends most of the book describing the walls full of diamonds and emeralds, describing the holgrams in the computer rooms of heaven! What is all that?

Help other customers find the most h

Key Phrases – Statistically Improbable Phrases (SIPs):  (learn more)

angelic writings, angelic race, angelic assembly, angelic company, angelic warriors, pearl gates, sacred vaults, full league, crystal dome, angelic host, imperial figure, ancient monarchs, demon seed, sapphire eyes, chief princes

Key Phrases – Capitalized Phrases (CAPs): (learn more)

Ancient Ones, Ancient of Days, Holy Watchers, Tower of Winds, Royal House of Yehovah, Sword of State, Second Heaven, Chief Prince Michael, Palace of Archangels, Crystal Palace, Darkened Councils, Most High, Mount of the North, Wendy Ale (Wendy Alec appears in Novel!!), Yehovah Himself, Black Citadel, Gardens of Fragrance, Seat of Kings, Slowly Michael, Chamber of Congregation, Cliffs of Eden, May Yehovah, Slowly Lucifer, The Stygian, Waters of Eden

 

 

 

New!

 

 

 

 

 

GUEST

Wendy Alec: ‘The Fall of Lucifer’

The 700 Club

 

CBN.com – Wendy Alec started writing the screenplay for The Chronicle of Brothers five years ago. Then, it developed into what will be a series of epic novels with the same name. The first in the fictional series is The Fall of Lucifer. It has the archangels Michael, Gabriel, Lucifer as brothers and follows what happened in heaven when God decided to create man and Lucifer’s fall from heaven.

 

Though the first novel is the great expose of Lucifer, Wendy says it really is God the Father’s story, not Lucifer’s. She feels that the veil was lifted and she had the Father’s permission to reveal some heavenly truths. She studied scripture and added the fictional parts, such as the archangels Michael, Gabriel, and Lucifer being brothers.

 

She had to ask the Lord for permission write this and each part of the book. Wendy was very careful with her choices of writing and where the novel has gone. She always was seeking God’s approval on everything.

 

Wendy wrote it in the fear of the Lord and feels that it is a commission to write these stories. While it’s a work of fiction, she wrote it in under the anointing of the office of the prophet and seer, and she considers it a more revelatory work. Wendy would be in a mode of worship and she would write and she would find herself weeping while writing this.

 

POSITIVE RESPONSE

The Chronicle of Brothers series is being developed into a comic and graphic novel. This came about when some unsaved comic book creators started reading The Fall of Lucifer. They really liked it and now they are developing it into a secular comic that will be distributed in Japan, Britain and U.S. So far, The Fall of Lucifer has been more in the secular market and various Christian booksellers just to name a few.

 

It is getting good responses from readers. One woman was in an airport and was laid over. She bought the novel at an airport bookstore and couldn’t put it down for six hours. Christian readers sense a real love of God and fear of the Lord. Readers in London are also responding well. The book was tested in a secular youth group and the readers liked it.

 

Wendy feels that the story is getting favorable reviews because the story is infused with God. Also, everybody is God-birthed, we will always have a hunger for God. Jesus is the Great Storyteller and His story is the Great Plot.

 

CREATIVE EVANGELISM

Wendy has always had a passion for creative evangelism, using the media, commercial production, and any other creative means to spread the Gospel. She has a background in working in commercial TV and has been doing Christian TV for 10 years. She says there is a divide in Christian and commercial media. Christian TV really equips the Church, but that is only half of the picture. There should be commercial Christian media and Christians should understand the crowd they are trying to reach. With her media experience she says the first will be last and the last will be first. In other words, she was able to minister to the Christians with God TV first, now she wants to minister to the lost. She hopes to reach 1 billion with commercial media – comics, movies, etc. The Chronicle of Brothers is an epic story that can reach pop culture of the day, like the the Lord of the Rings. In October 2006 she hopes Messiah, the second novel in The Chronicle of Brothers, will be out.

 

 

 

#

 

I’ll just follow the theme of this “post” by “borrowing” someone’s comment about this entry:

 

This form of marketing is dishonest, and is tantamount to bearing false witness.

 

It would be completely acceptable if the post indicated that you were the author, or were employed by the author, and that you were enjoying reading the book (and posting virtually identical reviews in multiple blogs), but it is completely dishonest to misrepresent yourself, and give us the impression that this was written by someone who happened to pick up your book and was enjoying it so much that she posted about it.

 

Comment by — 2006/01/06 @ 01:51 PM — (Reply)

#

 

If you want to know how it turns out, try the New Testament.

 

Personally, I was very disappointed in the book. The idea was definitely worth exploring, but the angelic beings were nothing more than tall humans with “chiseled features.” They showed all of our emotions, they bled, they grew (even though there is no marriage or copulation–are they created as children, younglings, then grow up to stay at age 30 forever?) they ate, they worked on issues scientifically (as if their knoweldge was no greater than ours), they lived many “moons” before moons were created (what plenet were they on?), and they even took a dump at one point. They could change form, but could still be chained. They could be … Oh forget it, they’re just humans. How interesting is that?

 

Every character and scene was stereotypical of B-grade books and movies. Nothing remotely new or interesting. Human history passed in a haphazard thread that would make no sense to a non-Christian reader. She seemed in a big hurry to get to Jesus and then get really emotional about things that should be slowly and meaningfully explored in the next book. She really moved too quickly. This story should have spent more time in Satan’s head. Forget the stupid DNA scientists! How lame!

 

I could go on and on about the HUGE plot holes throughout, but…how can there be any good reveiws about this book. It was so terrible!

 

Hope that helps!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wendy Alec Chronicles of Brothers:The Fall of Lucifer and The First Judgement

 

Sunday, 18 November 2007

10:11:53 AM

 

The most expensive Tract ever at £47 7×7=49

Theological errors

Friends

Positive only of course.

Bickle

           

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Milton did it better, 27 Oct 2007

By        Jl Munro “jimmunro” (Strathaven Scotland) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

How do you describe the indescribable? Wendy makes a valiant attempt but in spite of using almost all the most colourful adjectives in the language she cannot make understandable, what is by definition beyond human understanding.Why does the Almighty need an army on the scale described? Why do three immensely powerful beings behave like standard sword and sorcery princelings – and not very intelligent ones at that? I would seriously suggest those who were moved to tears by this should try reading Milton’s Paradise Lost, a voice from a time when many truly believed that the forces of AntiChrist were massing on the horizon and that the great battle between good and evil was being literally fought out across Europe. She writes well and from the heart and it’s a good read – but….

Comment

 

 

 

           

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars A Don’t Read, May 23, 2007

By        DJ West (Pheonix, AZ USA) – See all my reviews

When one wants to describe fiction well here it is. I would say this book could be said fiction, fiction, fiction. It has so much unBibical stuff it could lead any unBeliever further from God. I wish there was a way to make the author understand what kind of bad reputation she has done as a author. I will never again buy a book from her again.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

           

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Mind-numbingly boreing!, April 13, 2007

By        Michael Little “HistoBuff” (OCONUS) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

This is exactly why i don’t read fiction. This book portrays itself as facts but the author spends way too much time on details. i don’t really need 3 paragraphs describing exatly what a particular gate looked like. I’m not sure how this book got past an editor, but obviously it did. Alot of this book is highly inacurate according to the Bible and the Satanic bible about The Fall. It does have it good points and will draw you in, only to completely bore you minutes later.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

           

3 of 8 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Too much fluff…, March 21, 2007

By        Heather Tenney (Cincinnati, OH) – See all my reviews

Something most writers never learn–brevity. This author never learned how to be concise either. I tried to read it, I really did! I was very excited about the book, thought I’d love it. I couldn’t get past the pages and pages of over the top imagery and the descriptions. She was trying to create word pictures of what Heaven is like, and went way overboard. (I made it through the Left Behind books, and they are really badly written and I don’t agree with all of their premises either. That says a lot about the way this was written.) I didn’t get far enough to have much to say about the theology of the book–but the idea of Michael, Gabriel and Satan being brothers, I just didn’t like. I think you need to be very solid in your faith before reading this, don’t actually think this is real. Satan is real, God is real, angels are real, but it is a work of fiction. And a badly written one at that. I’d give it fewer stars, but I am encouraged that someone is trying to tackle the idea of the Heavens and the spiritual realm.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review

 

 

           

1 of 10 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely DIRE :(, 2 Sep 2006

By        Romayne Wright “Ha Tikvah” (N. Ireland U.K.) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

Think this is about the first time ever I’ve bought a book with fairly high expectations, only to be utterly disappointed, and downright annoyed to a degree on how anyone who calls themselves a Christian could write such drivel about a very sensitive subject. Almost all of this book was so totally boring, and rarely managed to make me consider any of the story interesting enough to turn the page at times. I ended up speed reading it, only to confirm my initial thoughts – that I certainly wasn’t going to find it an inspirational or remotely interesting story. In fact, I wonder why she feels its a suitable topic to write about to start with, and the mystical way in which the story is woven just depressed me. Having God’s HOLY angels cavorting around playing games on each other was just ridiculous reading even for a fictional piece – all I can say is if you’re a Christian steer clear. If you’re an atheist with an interest in the occult you might possibly enjoy it enough to keep reading past the first chapter.

Comment Comme

 

           

6 of 11 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Tries to take on Universal mysteries and present them as a Soap Opera. Fails., 12 Aug 2006

By        J.S (UK) – See all my reviews

Hyperbole and filled with paradox, with no attempt whatsoever at imagination. The author tries to describe the indescribable, attributing human/ mortal traits to angels and describing heaven in terms of a physical world i.e. – gold, rubies, diamonds in abundance everywhere, which frankly would pale in beauty after a few millennia for even the most fervent of God botherers. One suspects that if there is such a place as Heaven, it would be completely mind blowing. Many Authors have a gift for creating mystical places, a gift this Author is clearly missing.

 

Fails to explore the paradox of Lucifer, by attributing free will and souls to angels, where they previously have never had these things. The conundrum of Lucifer is that God created this being with no free will, but it turns from God. What should have been explored is why Jehovah would create a being that would turn against him and hate his new creation – man. This intimates a use or purpose for Lucifer the Renegade.

 

To make the point, why would one of the leaders of the kings of heaven be wearing a monocle?? Attributing mortal deteriation of the body to a non-physical being, designed to be immortal is just silly.

 

There have been many attempts by Man to describe or understand the nature of God and his Angels, eternity and Mans place, however this book doesn’t make a dint in the mystery.

 

If you’re into stuff like this, try the following: The Bible, The Qur’an, The Torah, The Book of Enoch, The Dead Sea Scrolls etc. These titles don’t have the Dynasty/ Brookside element that Wendy Alec has introduced to the greatest of mysteries, but you’ll get a clearer picture ;-)

Comment Comment | Permalink | Was this review helpful to you?

 

 

 

           

7 of 13 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but falls short somewhat, 7 Jun 2006

By        J. Snape “snap69″ – See all my reviews

(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)  

This book could have been so much better. The story is a classic and so ripe for a ripping fantasy yarn, and Alec does inject a stackload of characters and builds a whole almost governmental structure into heaven, but somehow I just don’t think it works.

The book would have benefitted from a strict editor and I doubt that there was one. Published by a christian organisation and written by an evangelist of sorts, a little more secular objectivity would have made for a better story. More specifically, I couldn’t help feeling that the entire story was being rushed along in parts and set up for yet more espousing of the endless beauty of God, almost ad nauseum.

I’d agree that where it really falls short is in the lack of depth of characterisation. The opportunity to look right into the darkest of mythology’s souls (Lucifer’s) goes begging. It all seemed a bit rushed and full of missed opportunities to expand on the whole story.

The next book is Messiah, and I’ll probably buy it, but I really hope that it isn’t another commentary on the New Testament, which it has every risk of being.

 

 

           

7 of 11 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars Missing some depth, 29 May 2006

By        A. D. MacFarlane (England, UK) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I felt that this novel fell short of what it could have been. My first main criticism is that the outcome was far too clear-cut. Yes, we all know that Lucifer will fall and Michael and Gabriel will not, but Wendy Alec did next to nothing to play with this assumption. What do I mean? Well, for just a handful of pages, there was this wonderful doubt about Gabriel’s fate – I found myself thinking ‘Surely he won’t fall!’. I never had that doubt with either Lucifer – the moment he heard of Man he got in a huff and decided that they would usurp his position as Jehovah’s most beloved – or Michael – he was like a piece of cardboard, to be honest. The novel would have been so much better if I had found myself wondering about the fates of all three brothers, if even for just a moment I wondered how they would fulfill their known destiny because something that happened made it look as if they would swing the other way. Because this happened with Gabriel, for just a moment, I found him the most interesting character.

 

Which leads me to my second main criticism: lack of depth in characterisation. I never felt like I got into the heads of any of the three brothers… but they’re the main characters, surely, as the series is named after them. With Lucifer, his turmoil was only ever seen by others; I would have loved to get right inside his head while he still struggled with himself, before he fell. I would also like to have known Michael’s motives rather than just take for granted that he will serve Jehovah forever. Even Gabriel, who was the most interesting, didn’t get nearly as much depth as he deserved.

 

A final criticism, and one that is probably just me being anal, is her writing style. She started almost all of her sentences with either the character’s name or the pronoun (he), which is incredibly dull to read. Also, she had a habit of listing adjectives while describing something, which doesn’t quite bring the scene to life.

 

 

           

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars Average, 26 April 2006

By        A. R. Fletcher (UK) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I had great expectations for this book, unfortunately I finished it feeling unfulfilled. It could have been something amazing but turned out quite average. Within the first pages there was a mistake in the text, Wendy states that Gabriel is riding a large white mare, within the next paragraph the mare becomes a white stallion, this kind of mistake is pure sloppiness and I always find it an irritation in books that have been professionally printed and one assumes proof read.

 

The book attempts to get across the pure majesty and awesomeness of God, which is a feat in itself, Wendy attacks it quite verbosely and you can end up struggling with the whole concept and imagery.

 

I struggled with some of the concepts explored within the book, in particular the involvement of the angels in creation and the ark. I felt that Wendy had moved away from biblical principals, I imagine this is always a struggle when writing a novel, however I felt uncomfortable with her interpretations.

 

All in all it was ok but not as promising as it looked.

 

 

           

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars Missed Opportunity, 19 April 2006

By        A. Baker “CytBO3″ (U.K.) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I approached this book with relish, it sounded to me like a great read exploring what could have been the real story behind the fall of Lucifer. However, the story – whilst essentially gripping, misses a number of opportunities. In particualr the actual fall of lucifer himself is not explained particualrly well – one moment he is an adoring and loyal servant of God the next he is a jealous and petulant child. There is barely an explanation for this change, no explanation for the pride and jealousy which materislises from one page to the next. What results is less an intelligent exploration of the motives of the characters involved and more an overly descriptive, slightly embellished and unoriginal recitation of the same story we have been told before. It is a shame that the author couldn’t resist the temptation to preach rather than properly explore her material. I was however, particualrly amused by the angels use of science in designing man – it’s worth a read for that if nothing else.

 

           

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Yuk!, 19 April 2006

By        Shivari (London, UK) – See all my reviews

 

I bought this during a quick trip to a bookstore to grab some holiday reading. I hadn’t read any reviews, but it seemed promising. I struggled through one chapter or so, then gave up. My problem was the way that the author represents the speech of the archangels. Unless you’re a devout Christian believer, it will leave you gagging. For me, Alec simply fails to deliver a genuine sense of love and awe in their words, and instead produces a twee, saccharin mush. The thought of spending eternity gushing like that would be enough to send the most devout angel into rebellion. Which, of course, it does!

 

Granted it must be very difficult to reproduce how an archangel might talk about God – but CS Lewis makes a fair go of it in Perelandra (Voyage to Venus). Alec fails miserably.

 

ANNALS OF THE ARCHANGELS

THE ILLUMINATI

 

 

THREE EARTHLY BROTHERS

RAPTURE

MILLENIUM

 

Spammed Reviews.

 

 

 

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 starsHorrible Dialogue, February 2, 2007

By

Clifton GoodwinSee all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

The book has an interesting premise, almost like a Shakespearean epic of the turmoil between three princes, but gosh the dialogue is so badly written it’s hard to hack your way along after a while.. just tiresome. I’m sorry but it’s the truth!

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you? <!– function showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ document.write(““); } function restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } function showYesButton(vUrl, uId){ var yesImg = ““; document.write(yesImg); } function showNoButton(vUrl, uId){ var noImg = ““; document.write(noImg); } function sendYesNoRating(vUrl,uId){ restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); var voteLayer = document.getElementById(‘YesNoVotingFrame_’+uId); var ifDoc; if ( voteLayer.contentDocument ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentDocument; } else if ( voteLayer.contentWindow ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentWindow.document; } else if ( voteLayer.document ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.document; } if ( ifDoc ) { ifDoc.location.replace(vUrl); } else { voteLayer.src = vUrl; } if ( ”.length > 0 ) { showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uId); } return false; } function showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uid) { var noBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_no’); var yesBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_yes’); var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uid); if( noBtn != null && yesBtn != null && msgLayer != null) { noBtn.style.display = ‘none'; yesBtn.style.display = ‘none'; msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } } function showYesNoResponse(uId,result,value) { var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); if ( result == “SUCCESS” ) { msgLayer.innerHTML = “
Thanks for your feedback.”; } else { showVoteErrorResponse(msgLayer,result,value, “”); } } //–> <!– var uId = ‘2115R146BP7SC47A0SHelpfulReviews3′; var vyUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.id=ARFI9WNO103XB&type=if&uid=2115R146BP7SC47A0SHelpfulReviews3&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S&label=Helpful&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1=1&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2=1&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; var vnUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.id=ARFI9WNO103XB&type=if&uid=2115R146BP7SC47A0SHelpfulReviews3&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S&label=Helpful&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.1=1&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR146BP7SC47A0S.contentAssoc.2=1&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; document.write(”);showYesButton(vyUrl,uId); showNoButton(vnUrl,uId); document.write(”);showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); //–> YesNoYesNo

 

<!– document.write( “Report this” ); //–> Report this Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

6 of 10 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 starsNot really worth a read , January 7, 2007

By

humbleservant (USA) – See all my reviews

I wouldn’t find it easy to recommend this book to anyone either, as a couple have already mentioned. To be fair, this isn’t an easy topic for a novel, much less any religious discussion (if one were to lecture on it, for instance), but there were too many problems in the book for it to be all that enjoyable a read. I’m used to overlooking such issues and giving books a better review than perhaps some have deserved, even if I keep those opinions to myself. But I’ve decided to give my first amazon review on this book, mainly as a balance for all the positive ones it’s received so far…it deserves some more constructive cricism.

If you’re one to be bothered by the unbibilical events and the like in the book, then I definitely wouldn’t recommend it. What happens in the book doesn’t make it so terrible, but I was not pleased with the way the angels seem to run everything in Heaven, as some other reviewers have also mentioned. I tried to get past that so that I could at least finish the book, but also what I found a hindrance and often an annoyance as well was the excessive descriptiveness of the environment and even the adornments and garments of the angels and places in heaven. I don’t say it to be picky, but as a warning, just the way the author uses such words to describe everything in heaven, (often it seems everything has a jewel on it), to attempt to portray the beauty of the place or to make for better richness of her description of it seems that she’s overcompensating for a lack of delivery in other areas, or just that there’s too much emphasis on these material goods because she has no other way to describe the beauty of that realm. It helps that another review said that the book was originally a script for a movie, which would have helped with the descriptivenss of the text, but much of the detail could have actually been left out for the book itself. I got really lost in just trying to imagine these really fantastical places, in and outside of heaven. It really came across to me as highly materialistic, as if the emphasis should have been more on the visual and material wealth of heaven, as if all that was the beauty of that (hope that makes some sense). Some readers might not be annoyed by that at all though. And I agree with one review that mentioned the lack of continuity or even a certain connection between the prologue and the epilogue.

*Some spoilers* Though the story does have a few good points, just events or explanations that I kind of liked, such as painting Lucifer as the “author of death” when he killed his pet panther, it seemed to me that the characterization wasn’t always that strong, not of Lucifer the deceiver, he didn’t yet come across as the kind of mastermind I’d imagined him to be. And it wasn’t too pleasing to read Gabriel as one who wavered in his loyalty to God and the Christos. Sure, the book’s about the familial relationship between the three “brothers” and even does well enough in portraying Gabriel as the youngest of the three and therefore one to look up to Lucifer, and one to find it the most difficult (at times) to eschew Lucifer’s advances and offers after the fall. But Gabriel did not at all come across as the strong, loyal and pure angel that he was even when he delivered the message to Mary before she was to conceive Jesus.

As was mentioned in some other reviews, especially the ones that gave the book fewer stars than most, which I do not disagree with, one problem I had with the story was the emphasis on the importance of DNA in the human race and the corruption of that DNA as the cause for the flood. It could make sense in some other ways, for one to kind of explain the cause for the Nephilim away, but it strays too much from Biblical truth, I believe, and that makes it less enjoyable, if not in some ways slightly disturbing. And the book had the angels handling way too much activity and decision-making processes in Heaven. Whenever there was a problem in Heaven or with the human race, it was always the angels who decided the solution for every situation, not God. God was nearly nonexistant. It was good that Christos had a place, but not as often as I would have liked or as would have made sense. And the angels had a place for science. It perhaps demonstrates the author’s use of Enochian texts (as another reviewer mentioned) since there isn’t much to go on from the Bible in regards to what angels knew of the practice anyway. It might be there to explain the origins of science (might happen later in the series), where humans might have obtained the knowledge from, but that the angels were working out specific equations even for the building of the ark (completely took out the part where God Himself gave those directions to Noah), and even with the DNA of Man shows too much of their involvement with the workings of the Universe, as if God were never even needed. It was all very weird.

I found the “Chronicles of the Host” series, by Brian Shafer, a much more enjoyable read. It covered the stories in the Bible from the perspective of the angels and had really great moments. I think it’s a much better read if one wants to imagine what it might have been like amongst the angels, etc. That’s the kind of book I’d recommend.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews

Was this review helpful to you? <!– function showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ document.write(““); } function restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId){ var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } function showYesButton(vUrl, uId){ var yesImg = ““; document.write(yesImg); } function showNoButton(vUrl, uId){ var noImg = ““; document.write(noImg); } function sendYesNoRating(vUrl,uId){ restoreYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); var voteLayer = document.getElementById(‘YesNoVotingFrame_’+uId); var ifDoc; if ( voteLayer.contentDocument ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentDocument; } else if ( voteLayer.contentWindow ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.contentWindow.document; } else if ( voteLayer.document ) { ifDoc = voteLayer.document; } if ( ifDoc ) { ifDoc.location.replace(vUrl); } else { voteLayer.src = vUrl; } if ( ”.length > 0 ) { showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uId); } return false; } function showLoadingMessageForYesNo(uid) { var noBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_no’); var yesBtn = document.getElementById(uid+’_yes’); var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uid); if( noBtn != null && yesBtn != null && msgLayer != null) { noBtn.style.display = ‘none'; yesBtn.style.display = ‘none'; msgLayer.innerHTML = “”; } } function showYesNoResponse(uId,result,value) { var msgLayer = document.getElementById(“thanks” + uId); if ( result == “SUCCESS” ) { msgLayer.innerHTML = “
Thanks for your feedback.”; } else { showVoteErrorResponse(msgLayer,result,value, “”); } } //–> <!– var uId = ‘2115R3U527KG8AQCSNHelpfulReviews4′; var vyUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&type=if&uid=2115R3U527KG8AQCSNHelpfulReviews4&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN&label=Helpful&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.id=A2SJ8Q2EM03I8Q&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; var vnUrl = ‘http://www.amazon.com/gp/vote/ref=cm_cr_pr_voteyn?ie=UTF8&type=if&uid=2115R3U527KG8AQCSNHelpfulReviews4&uri=%2Fgp%2Fcustomer-reviews%2Fproduct%2F1591858143&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2=1&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.id=B000HPBIYA&qv=2%7CbySubmissionDateDescending%7Ccm%5Fcr%5Fpr%5Flink%5Fnext%5F2&contentId=2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN&label=Helpful&qk=pageNumber%7CsortBy%7Cref%5F&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.2.type=ProductSet&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.id=A2SJ8Q2EM03I8Q&2115%7CR3U527KG8AQCSN.contentAssoc.1.type=AmazonCustomer&ifRes=showYesNoResponse&context=Reviews&needsSignIn=1&#8242;; document.write(”);showYesButton(vyUrl,uId); showNoButton(vnUrl,uId); document.write(”);showYesNoDefaultMessage(uId); //–> YesNoYesNo

 

<!– document.write( “Report this” ); //–> Report this Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment

 

 

 

 

           

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars This book is just plain bad, December 14, 2006

By        T. D. Newton “gdtarrant” (Denver, CO) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

Let me preface by saying that I don’t normally read Christian fiction and I don’t normally write book reviews, so this is a double-first for me. I purchased this book because I think alternate views of Biblical mythology are good fuel to get me thinking. I’d never tell someone else that they would or wouldn’t like this book; this review is to tell you why I disliked this book so much. This may contain a few spoilers, but seeing as how this book is supposed to be part 1 of 5 I do not think it’s much of an issue.

 

First and foremost, the book is full of bad writing. Major writing mistakes are things like discontinuity (Michael takes off his cloak and then takes it off again), improper usage of expressions (Lucifer recoiling at the use of the word MAN but then a few pages later referring to another angel as “a man of their word”), typos that could have been found by a simple proofread, and redundant embellishment (…with jewels of every type one could imagine: rubies, diamonds, emeralds…). There were many chapters that were simply too short; a break in the chapter to go to a new one was completely unnecessary. Finally, the Prologue and the Epilogue portions were completely disconnected and pointless. You should be able to take them out of the story and still have it be complete, but they should still relate to the story (otherwise why have them?).

 

Bad writing I can forgive, to a certain extent, if the story, premise, plot, characters, or other elements have value. Unfortunately, the other major problem I have with this novel is that none of those things have value. The author has deviated so far from Biblical mythology that I was either scratching my head (or cursing aloud) through the entire second half of the book. A good example of this is the purpose of Noah’s Ark; Lucifer plans to eradicate the human race by having his fallen angels breed with the human women and mutate our DNA. Both here and much earlier in the book I questioned the motivations; if you can physically affect a human being via fornication, why not actually just kill them? A friend of mine said the fact that there were science labs in heaven and that Lucifer and Gabriel basically “held hands and skipped down the beach” made him stop reading the book 6 chapters in. He also didn’t like the fact that there were unicorns (and blue griffons) in heaven.

 

I struggled through to the end, hoping (and praying) that I would find some kind of redeeming quality in the novel’s content, but it was not to be. You may be able to look past these things but, being an aspiring writer myself, I really take notice when things are done this poorly. The author is in dire need of a thesaurus and a good proofreader. I would imagine that the only type of person that could really enjoy this book is one who has not studied the mythology or read the Bible; the same kind of people who believe there is some element of truth to movies like Constantine.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

Report this | Permalink

Comment Comment (1)

 

 

 

           

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Don’t bother reading this book, October 6, 2006

By        Robert Sillas (Yuba City, CA United States) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I first saw this book and I really thought it would be interesting, I’m a avid Christian fiction reader, and I study the Word of God daily, but with that being said I tried to read this book, and I kept saying come on now, and no way, it happened so much that I put the down, and I hope to sell it, to a used book store,

 

Some of the problems I have with the book are:

Gabriel actually couldn’t make his mind up and Michael the archangel thought he might side with Lucifer?

And how she (being the author) deals with the flood of Noah, the angels actually think that man has been completely corrupted, and God will destroy the whole earth, and that Lucifer will win, and someone at the last second, actually figures out that the genealogy of Noah was uncorrupted, now that’s was enough for me, she sell the angels so short that they actually think God, the I AM, the creator of the Universe, and Man, almost lost, completely sells God short.

 

Don’t read this one, at least that’s my opinion, God bless

 

           

8 of 17 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars Diappointing and quite frankly rather boring, July 3, 2006

By        Tamilore (London, United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

My main problem with this novel is that it was severely lacking in substance. When dealing with a topic like ‘the fall of Lucifer’ which, has been dealt with by many an author, some level of finesse is required in characterisation and general plot. Wendy Alec fails to deliver any form of characterisation and instead relies on her rather suspect skills of description as she attempts to conjure up an image of the unimaginable, Heaven. I didn’t give this book 1 star because it was badly written or because there was no ‘meat’ to the story. I gave this book 1 star because it just utterly failed to captivate me. There was a great deal of repetition of language and imagery, I mean if I had to read one more sentence about hair ‘braided with platinum and lightning’, I would have screamed! Most sci-fi and fantasy novels try to depict too many events and characters and thus leave a disjointed product. In this novel, the cast is of a manageable size and the main players are clear. This could have potentially made it easier to understand and empathise with the characters but somehow it all falls flat here.

In ‘The Fall of Lucifer’, we are presented with a story that has essentially been told in the Judaeo-Christian religious writings. A story of how Lucifer, ‘Son of the Morning’ and archanagel of the Almighty, becomes the Satan we know today. The decision to tackle this subject matter as a fantasy novel intrigued me and I bought this book in the hopes of reading an interesting take on extant subject matter. That is not what I came to find. I feel that since the author clearly had nothing new to add, and didn’t take the time to craft realistic and interesting characters with motivations and agendas, she should just not have bothered writing this novel at all.

 

1 of 11 people found the following review helpful:

3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable, if slightly flawed read, April 9, 2006

By        Mr. M. O. Ajose (London United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)  

I enjoyed this novel because of its interesting take on Biblical events. Alec’s characterisation of the angels was solid and you really feel a deep sense of Lucifer’s alienation and pain after his fall and the emotional rift between himself and his brothers.

My qualms with the novel were that although Alec’s descriptions are mostly vivid and illustrative throughout, they sometimes bordered on the childlike (e.g. ‘ten thousand times ten thousands eons of love’). I also had issue with the way in which the angels are described as co-creators with God (of man) and felt that more intense, longer war scenes could have been included when describing Lucifer’s rebellion.

Otherwise, the pacing of the novel was good and the immersive fantasy worlds described show that it was OBVIOUSLY written to be filmed (the story was originally a screenplay). The idea of Lucifer’s jealousy of mankind, although not strictly biblical, is interesting and plausible. Alec manages to clearly & imaginately explain the gospel message, whilst weaving a pacy, exciting read.

 

           

20 of 25 people found the following review helpful:

2.0 out of 5 stars Confused, February 17, 2006

By        J.DeW. (America) – See all my reviews

Alec is unable to display spiritual worlds. Lucifer is in rebellion at the idea of a material yet Heaven is described by Alec as being very much a material realm (they eat, sleep, draw blood from one another, have computers and electronic equipment!!!).

Furthermore, it seems silly and somewhat blasphemous for an evangelical Christian like Alec to even float the idea that God needs the help of billions and billions of sapphire armored, platinum braided, emerald tinged angels (this is the way Alec writes) to assist in creating the universe.

I was very disappointed by this book.

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? YesNo

           

           

 

           

19 of 28 people found the following review helpful:

1.0 out of 5 stars What Is She Going on About?, February 8, 2006

By        cherie (new york) – See all my reviews

This could have been a great story! Instead Alec rather rip off Sword and Sorcery, Dungeons and Dragons (both of which she probably so piously disapproves).

She spends most of the book describing the walls full of diamonds and emeralds, describing the holgrams in the computer rooms of heaven! What is all that?

Help other customers find the most h

Key Phrases – Statistically Improbable Phrases (SIPs):  (learn more)

angelic writings, angelic race, angelic assembly, angelic company, angelic warriors, pearl gates, sacred vaults, full league, crystal dome, angelic host, imperial figure, ancient monarchs, demon seed, sapphire eyes, chief princes

Key Phrases – Capitalized Phrases (CAPs): (learn more)

Ancient Ones, Ancient of Days, Holy Watchers, Tower of Winds, Royal House of Yehovah, Sword of State, Second Heaven, Chief Prince Michael, Palace of Archangels, Crystal Palace, Darkened Councils, Most High, Mount of the North, Wendy Ale (Wendy Alec appears in Novel!!), Yehovah Himself, Black Citadel, Gardens of Fragrance, Seat of Kings, Slowly Michael, Chamber of Congregation, Cliffs of Eden, May Yehovah, Slowly Lucifer, The Stygian, Waters of Eden

 

 

 

New!

 

 

 

 

 

GUEST

Wendy Alec: ‘The Fall of Lucifer’

The 700 Club

 

CBN.com – Wendy Alec started writing the screenplay for The Chronicle of Brothers five years ago. Then, it developed into what will be a series of epic novels with the same name. The first in the fictional series is The Fall of Lucifer. It has the archangels Michael, Gabriel, Lucifer as brothers and follows what happened in heaven when God decided to create man and Lucifer’s fall from heaven.

 

Though the first novel is the great expose of Lucifer, Wendy says it really is God the Father’s story, not Lucifer’s. She feels that the veil was lifted and she had the Father’s permission to reveal some heavenly truths. She studied scripture and added the fictional parts, such as the archangels Michael, Gabriel, and Lucifer being brothers.

 

She had to ask the Lord for permission write this and each part of the book. Wendy was very careful with her choices of writing and where the novel has gone. She always was seeking God’s approval on everything.

 

Wendy wrote it in the fear of the Lord and feels that it is a commission to write these stories. While it’s a work of fiction, she wrote it in under the anointing of the office of the prophet and seer, and she considers it a more revelatory work. Wendy would be in a mode of worship and she would write and she would find herself weeping while writing this.

 

POSITIVE RESPONSE

The Chronicle of Brothers series is being developed into a comic and graphic novel. This came about when some unsaved comic book creators started reading The Fall of Lucifer. They really liked it and now they are developing it into a secular comic that will be distributed in Japan, Britain and U.S. So far, The Fall of Lucifer has been more in the secular market and various Christian booksellers just to name a few.

 

It is getting good responses from readers. One woman was in an airport and was laid over. She bought the novel at an airport bookstore and couldn’t put it down for six hours. Christian readers sense a real love of God and fear of the Lord. Readers in London are also responding well. The book was tested in a secular youth group and the readers liked it.

 

Wendy feels that the story is getting favorable reviews because the story is infused with God. Also, everybody is God-birthed, we will always have a hunger for God. Jesus is the Great Storyteller and His story is the Great Plot.

 

CREATIVE EVANGELISM

Wendy has always had a passion for creative evangelism, using the media, commercial production, and any other creative means to spread the Gospel. She has a background in working in commercial TV and has been doing Christian TV for 10 years. She says there is a divide in Christian and commercial media. Christian TV really equips the Church, but that is only half of the picture. There should be commercial Christian media and Christians should understand the crowd they are trying to reach. With her media experience she says the first will be last and the last will be first. In other words, she was able to minister to the Christians with God TV first, now she wants to minister to the lost. She hopes to reach 1 billion with commercial media – comics, movies, etc. The Chronicle of Brothers is an epic story that can reach pop culture of the day, like the the Lord of the Rings. In October 2006 she hopes Messiah, the second novel in The Chronicle of Brothers, will be out.

 

 

 

#

 

I’ll just follow the theme of this “post” by “borrowing” someone’s comment about this entry:

 

This form of marketing is dishonest, and is tantamount to bearing false witness.

 

It would be completely acceptable if the post indicated that you were the author, or were employed by the author, and that you were enjoying reading the book (and posting virtually identical reviews in multiple blogs), but it is completely dishonest to misrepresent yourself, and give us the impression that this was written by someone who happened to pick up your book and was enjoying it so much that she posted about it.

 

Comment by — 2006/01/06 @ 01:51 PM — (Reply)

#

 

If you want to know how it turns out, try the New Testament.

 

Personally, I was very disappointed in the book. The idea was definitely worth exploring, but the angelic beings were nothing more than tall humans with “chiseled features.” They showed all of our emotions, they bled, they grew (even though there is no marriage or copulation–are they created as children, younglings, then grow up to stay at age 30 forever?) they ate, they worked on issues scientifically (as if their knoweldge was no greater than ours), they lived many “moons” before moons were created (what plenet were they on?), and they even took a dump at one point. They could change form, but could still be chained. They could be … Oh forget it, they’re just humans. How interesting is that?

 

Every character and scene was stereotypical of B-grade books and movies. Nothing remotely new or interesting. Human history passed in a haphazard thread that would make no sense to a non-Christian reader. She seemed in a big hurry to get to Jesus and then get really emotional about things that should be slowly and meaningfully explored in the next book. She really moved too quickly. This story should have spent more time in Satan’s head. Forget the stupid DNA scientists! How lame!

 

I could go on and on about the HUGE plot holes throughout, but…how can there be any good reveiws about this book. It was so terrible!

 

Hope that helps!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More friends of the Alecs: Scandal breaks out on ORU Campus

Here’s the link folks

http://www.americablog.com/2007/10/oral-roberts-university-facing-huge.html

NEWSFLASH Prominent Televangelists face probe

http://www.cbn.com/CBNnews/265440.aspx?option=print

Note the number of televangelists who are under scrutiny who are also Rory and Wendy’s friends.

Benny Hinn

Kenneth and Gloria Copeland

This Story as you know is all over the world and everyone is discussing it. Readers need to see connection between investigated Televangelists and God TV. The connection thus exposed will remind you of their prophetic irresponsibility which submitting to correction and prayer would save them fro- and stuff  that they would absolutely loathe but be forced to submit.

Joyce meyer lifestyle otherwise she is kosher.

Crefflo and Taffi Dollar,

NEWSFLASH Rick Joyners Steve recalls Rick being told that if he writes that he will destroy his ministry

Steve Joyners Sidekick has come out with a whopper: that ‘if’ [rick joyner]writes that HE WILL DESTROY HIS MINISTRY. (my emphasis).

Lets look at the evidence: Rick joyner and the Alecs base their ministries on Visions that follow the typical Transported Into Heavens Model (Copeland, Duplantis, Alecs, Elijah List, ) that is virtually a prequisite for joining the elite fellowship.

So we have P60 about the new move of God a Fivefold bunch of apostles prophets teachers etc who can DISMANTLE and DISBAND ministries coming in the way (Harvest) and Rick joyner coming out with all sorts of stuff concerned with basically saying that JOYNER/NAR/ELIJAH LIST the Alecs and Chris Cole et al are repositories of the Truth the Pillar and  Foundation of TRUTH and the rest of us haven’t got it/don’t know the LORDS Voice.This smacks of Jehovahs Witness thinking on the saved 144,000 and the rest of humanity being sent to Perdition which as you know is NOT the heart of God.

I believe Joyner and the Alecs and Chris Cole with his CCM front are destroying their ministries by the exercise of the prophetic and that only by the right prayer prayer that they dont like love or desire can they be saved. Benny Hinn being cast off the show in an ignominius fashion.

God TV Night of 28 Oct 2007

Pre Edit machine time.